Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12540/661
Title: Educational leadership and self-determination theory in collectivist cultures
Authors: Kaur, Amrita 
Noman, Mohammad 
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Source: Kaur, A. & Mohammad, N. (2019). Educational Leadership and Self-Determination Theory in Collectivist. In Oxford Research Encyclopedia of EducationCultures. Oxford University Press.
Abstract: This is an advance summary of a forthcoming article in the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education. Please check back later for the full article. The nature of practices of educational leaders and their outcome in terms of productivity and teacher motivation are greatly shaped by the sociocultural norms that regulate them. The sociocultural norms proposed by Hofstede are widely considered as the benchmark for national cultural examination and comparison, which suggests that collectivist cultures are characterized by higher scores on power distance and uncertainty avoidance, and lower on individualism, masculinity, long-term orientation, and indulgence. These dimensions may exert positive, negative, or mixed influence, especially on organizations such as schools that constitute intricate work structures with a variety of stakeholders influencing them from multiple directions. Educational leadership for effective change in school requires the ability to integrate traditional sociocultural norms with the global principles for effective outcomes. Providing autonomous work environments has been widely found to be the most effective of these principles that lead to higher productivity and enhanced teacher motivation. In the context of work-organization, self-determination theory (SDT) has emerged as an effective motivational theory that proposes autonomy, competence, and relatedness as three universal psychological needs; satisfaction of these needs would predict optimal outcomes. Just like their individualistic culture counterparts, it is possible for school leaders in predominantly collectivist cultures to function in a need-supporting way for their teachers to yield desired outcomes.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12540/661
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.592
Appears in Collections:Scholarly Publications

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